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Cities in Distrito Federal, Brazil
City: # City: #
Águas Claras49 Núcleo Bandeirante7
Asa Norte94 Park Way13
ASA SUL45 PLANALTINA - DF3
Brasília558 Recanto das Emas5
Brazlândia2 Riacho Fundo 13
Candangolândia2 samambaia5
ceilandia9 Samambaia Norte3
Ceilândia - P.sul7 Santa Maria9
Ceilândia Norte2 São Sebastião3
Ceilândia P Norte1 Sobradinho42
Ceilândia Sul2 Sudoeste16
Cruzeiro19 Taguatinga66
Gama18 Taguatinga 1
Guará45 Taguatinga - Vicente Pires5
Jardim Botanico7 Tororó3
Lago Norte38 Valparaíso2
Lago Sul24 Vila Planalto5
Info about Distrito Federal, Brazil
Distrito Federal Travel Guide Login to edit Login to view History Help

Brasília, the capital of Brazil, is a planned city and it is a masterpiece of modernist architecture listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and attracts architecture fans worldwide.
Her basic structure was completed in just four years, from 1956 to 1960, and the plan is designed in the shape of a giant bird or airplane, with various separated zones assigned for specific functions such as housing, commerce, hospitals and banking.
A huge artificial lake serves the city as both a leisure area and to diminish the effects of low humidity in drier months.
Orientation and addresses
Getting a grasp of Brasilia's addresses may be a little perplexing at first, as they are usually shortened to acronyms. The Monumental Axis divides the city into north and south sectors. Acronyms ended in N refer to sectors on the northern side, while those ended in S are on the south. The “blocks” are numbered from 2 to 16. SHS/SHN - Hotel sectors (Setor Hoteleiro) SCS/SCN - Commercial sectors (Setor Comercial) SQS/SQN - Residential sectors (Superquadras) CLS/CLN (or SCLS/SCLN) - Local commerce sectors (Comércio Local) along the wings. Ex: CLN 206.
Climate
17°C to 28°C (63 to 82°F) are the average lows and highs. July, August and September are the worst months to go as it gets very dry. During those months the city is blessed with a gorgeous sunset in spectacular shades of orange, pink and red. The best months to go are probably May and June - still green, but no longer so hot, with fewer chances of rainfall.
Get in
By plane Brasilia's airport (phone:(61) 3364-9000, fax: (61) 3364-9251) is situated 11 km (7 mi) from the city center and has one of the few tourist information services in town (phone (61) 3033.9488, from 7.30 am to 10.30 pm). It also has an exchange office at the arrivals area, another one at Banco do Brasil (open Mo-Fri 11:00-16:00, departures area) and several ATMs.
Taxis are the most convenient means of getting from the airport into the city. They are relatively expensive for Brazilian standards and the 20-minute drive to the hotel zone should cost about R$ 30-40. Buses number 102 and 102.1 are frequent and significantly cheaper. They link the airport to the main bus terminal at Rodoviária, from where you can catch buses or the subway to other parts of the city.
By bus Travel times are about 13 hours to São Paulo, 18 hours to Rio, 10 hours to Belo Horizonte and 3 hours to Goiania. Buses from other States arrive at a dedicated bus station called rodoferroviaria (phone:(61) 3363-4045), connected to the city centre by bus (number 131, frequency each 10-20 minutes, from 5 am to midnight) and taxis.
By car Drivers coming from southern and Center-west states will arrive by the Saída Sul entrance. From other states, you'll enter Brasilia by Saída Norte.
Get around Ride the buses, take a cab, hitchhike, but whatever you do, don't plan on getting around Brasilia on foot. Note that the roads have few crosswalks or traffic lights, so being a pedestrian also requires some caution.
By bus Most local buses start from or go through the rodoviária, at the precise center of the city, and run along the "wings" - serving the residential zones - or through the Monumental Axis. Red minibuses, called Zebrinha or Transporte de Vizinhança are very useful for moving around, as they link the central area of Brasilia (Setor Comercial, Setor de Diversões etc.) to Esplanada dos Ministérios, the airport and some of the main avenues (L2 and W3).
By taxi Taxis are relatively expensive in Brasilia and usually can be hailed on the streets.
By subway It runs along the south wing, but stops only at block 114 (other stations seem to be forever under construction). The subway is open only Monday to Friday, 6 AM to 8 PM (!) and is not quite useful for moving around. There are, however, three points of interest along the line: the Buddhist Temple (EQS 115/116, access by "114 Sul" Station) and a typical fair in the satellite city of Guará (access by "Feira" Station).
By car If you arrive by car or decide to rent one there, note that drivers behave differently than in other places in Brazil:
Stop at pedestrian crossings - pedestrians will wave a hand before crossing or usually simply start walking. Keep an eye on the sidewalks at all times. Policemen enforce this rule and you can get fined if you disrespect it. Use of horns - do not honk unless you really need to. Brasilienses hate it and really appreciate their driving to be as silent as possible.
To See - The Square of the Three Powers (Praça dos Três Poderes) includes the seats of the country's 3 highest authorities: the Congress, the Presidential Palace (called Palácio do Planalto) and the Supreme Court. The bronze statue of two abstract figures is named Os Candangos and represents the pioneering spirit of the workers who built the city. There's also a "blind justice" statue by the Supreme Court, a small museum and a model, built to scale, of Brasilia itself. - Palace of Justice, and Itamaraty Palace which houses the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. - Brasilia Cathedral. - National Theater - The Television Tower is the best place for a sweeping panorama of the city. - The JK Memorial is a museum dedicated to the life and accomplishments of the president Juscelino Kubitschek, and houses his remains as well. - Palácio do Alvorada - The President's official residence. Its arches are icons of the capital. - Dom Bosco Church, Av. W3 sul, quadra 702. A beautiful modern church built on concrete and blue stained glass. It's impossible not to notice the huge crystal chandelier hanging from the ceiling in the middle of the square church. - Paranoá Lake - Pontão has lakeside restaurants and a park while the Ermida Dom Bosco chapel provides gorgeous views of the city from across the Lake, an excellent place to watch Brasilia's famous sunsets. - City Park (Parque da Cidade) - this wide green area is the city's hot spot for sports such as jogging, cycling, skating and even kart racing, as well as barbecues and other outdoor activities. - Brasilia National Park - cerrado vegetation and fauna, plus natural swimming pools. - On Sundays there is a flea market at the base of the Television Tower. - Brasilia's residential blocks have many local shops such as groceries, drugstores, bakers, restaurants, hairdressers and so forth, and that is where townspeople do much of their daily shopping.
Nightlife Despite not being particularly famous for its nightlife, Brasilia has some hangouts that save visitors from night-time boredom.
- Beirute - SQS 109 Bloco A (61) 3244-1717. Opens daily, until 2am. One of the oldest and most traditional bars in town, serves reasonably priced beer and Arab food, and attracts a mixed crowd of students, journalists, gay people and intellectuals. Is also one of the best places to pick up flyers and find out the best parties to go.
- Gates Pub - CLS 403 Bloco B. (61) 3225-4576/3322-9301 This pub-cum-club has a dartboard and is one of the few places to offer a week-round choice of nights, ranging from Brazilian music to alternative electronic stuff. Opens Mo/We 9pm, Tu/Thu/Sat/Sun 10 pm. Fri 11pm.
Contact The area code to Brasilia is 61 (also add Brazil's 55 if dialing from abroad). All 7-digit telephone numbers have recently been converted to 8-digit by adding a 3 before the number. To reach a number like 241-0000 from abroad, dial (55 61) 3241-0000.


Edited by: sartaris on 23.10.2006
Last postings about Distrito Federal Brazil from other users
 
mikhail wrote:

Plenty


valeria wrote:

Los Roques, Morrocoy (quedan relativamente cerca). En Caracas se puede ir a la casa de Bolivar, su tumba, El Avila, centros comerciales, teatros boulevares..


camburii wrote:

Brasilia, the political capital of Brazil, may look weird at first time, but its a wonderful place to live. Its architechture is unique. You can see most of the tourist sights in one or two days. There are dozens of parks, waterfalls and historic cities in the Region. I specially recomend Chapada dos Veadeiros National Park. Nightlife in Brasilia is not cheap but is less expensive than in São Paulo. My hometown Santos has the biggest harbor in Latin America and therefore has some lousy beaches. Nevertheless, it is less than 200km from the best spots in São Paulo's coast. It is less than 100km from São Paulo, Brasil's financial and industrial center. Downtown Santos is full of historic buildings, most of them from the golden age of coffee. The city is also home of Santos Futebol Clube, where I have two special seats. The best of the nightlife consists mainly of crowded pubs with live music.


mexicana wrote:

centro historico, museo de antropologia e historia, muchos mas museos vivo en la ciudad mas grande del mundo


ricardoszikora wrote:

beaches, rain forest, jungle, mountains...



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